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A List of Cannabis Fines and Infractions

(Listed by province)

Now that cannabis has been legalized in Canadaindividual provinces are finalizing laws and regulations concerning cannabis and cannabis consumption. Some provinces are much more severe than others, and the differences can vary greatly.

To help you navigate these new laws, we’ve compiled a list of fines and punishments by each province for offences such as driving while high to provincial by-laws and growing your own cannabis at home.

Penalties for Driving High

It really doesn’t matter which province you’re in, driving while high is illegal everywhere in Canada. The best way to avoid the penalties listed below, is to not drive high.

British Columbia

First offense:

  • Seizure of driver’s license for 90 days
  • Vehicle impounded for 3 days – driver responsible for towing fees
  • $200 fine

Second offense:

  • Seizure of driver’s license for 90 days
  • Vehicle impounded for 7 days
  • $300 fine
  • Possible driving course

Third offense:

  • Seizure of driver’s license for 90 days
  • Vehicle impounded for 30 days
  • $400 fine
  • Mandatory driving course
  • Possible mandatory ignition interlock (the device that measures THC or blood-alcohol level in blood in order to power vehicle)

More information on driving penalties in B.C. can be found on the government website.

Alberta

First offense:

  • Immediate 90-day licence suspension
  • Immediate 3-day vehicle seizure
  • Mandatory driving course
  • One-year participation in an ignition interlock program
  • $1,000 fine

Second offense

  • Immediate 90-day licence suspension
  • Mandatory driving course
  • One-year participation in an ignition interlock program
  • Mandatory 30-day imprisonment

Third offense

  • Mandatory driving course
  • One-year participation in an ignition interlock program
  • Mandatory 120-day imprisonment

The information above was found on the government of Alberta’s website.

Saskatchewan

First offense:

  • License suspension for 3 days
  • Impounded vehicle for 3 days
  • Mandatory driving course

New Criminal Code Charges:

  • Immediate driver’s licence suspension until the court has disposed of the charge
  • 30-day vehicle seizure – vehicle owner responsible for towing and impound fees
  • 60-day suspension if driver is also impaired by alcohol

Upon conviction

  • One-year driving suspension to a maximum of 5 years
  • Fine of $1,250 to $2,500
  • Mandatory driving course

More information related to the above can be found on the Government of Saskatchewan’s website.

Manitoba

First offense:

  • Suspension of driver’s license for one year
  • Possible 18 month imprisonment
  • $1,000 fine

Second offense:

  • 5 year suspension of driver’s license
  • Minimum 30 days imprisonment

Third offense:

  • 10 year suspension of driver’s license
  • Minimum 120 days imprisonment

Accident that leads to bodily harm or death:

  • 5 year suspension of driver’s license
  • Possible 10 year imprisonment

More information can be found on the website of Manitoba Public Insurance.

Ontario

The Ontario Ministry of Transportation lists three different categories of penalty: offense without indictment, charges, and court convictions.

First offense:

  • 3 day suspension of license
  • $250 fine

Second offense:

  • 7 day suspension of driver’s license
  • Mandatory education program costing $350

Third offense:

  • 30 day suspension of license
  • Treatment program
  • Ignition interlock device for 6 months
  • $450 fine
  • Mandatory medical exam

Court convictions – first offense:

  • Licence suspension of at least 1 year
  • Mandatory education or treatment program
  • Ignition interlock device for at least 1 year
  • Mandatory medical evaluation

Court convictions – second offense:

  • Licence suspension of at least 3 years
  • Mandatory education or treatment program
  • Ignition interlock device for at least 3 years
  • Mandatory medical evaluation

Court convictions – third offense:

  • Lifetime licence suspension
  • Mandatory education or treatment programs
  • Ignition interlock device for at least 6 years

Quebec

First offense:

  • Immediate suspension of license for 90 days
  • Possible suspension of license for one year
  • $1,000 fine

Second offense:

  • $2,000 fine.
  • Prison sentence with period determined by court

More information about Quebec’s driving penalties can be found on the SAAQ.

Prince Edward Island

Like Ontario, the Government of Prince Edward Island also separates penalties into three structures.

First offense:

  • 1 day license suspension
  • 7 day driving ban
  • vehicle impounded for 30 days

Second offense:

  • 1 day suspension of your license
  • 7 day driving ban
  • vehicle impounded for 60 days

Charge:

  • Vehicle impounded for 60 days

Court convictions – first offense:

  • 1 year revocation of driver’s license
  • 1 year driving ban

Court convictions – second offense:

  • 5 year revocation of driver’s license
  • 2 year driving ban

Court convictions – third offense:

  • 5 year revocation of driver’s license
  • 3 year driving ban

New Brunswick

The province of New Brunswick is the least clear of all the provinces about penalties related to driving while high. On the Government of New Brunswick‘s website, they list some possible punishments and/or penalties:

  • Immediate short-term roadside suspensions
  • An administrative licence suspension program
  • Discretionary and mandatory vehicle impoundment for short-term and administrative licence suspensions
  • Participation in a re-education course for drug-impaired drivers
  • Licence reinstatement fees
  • Zero tolerance for novice drivers and those under 21 years of age

Nova Scotia

First offence:

  • $1,000 fine
  • 1 year licence suspension

Second offence:

  • Imprisonment of up to 30 days
  • 3 year licence suspension

Third offence:

  • Imprisonment of up to 120 day
  • 5 year licence suspension

Fourth offence:

  • Indefinite revocation of licence

More information can be found here.

Newfoundland

First offense:

  • Vehicle impounded for 7 days
  • 1 year driving ban
  • $600 fine
  • Mandatory driving course

Second offense:

  • Vehicle impounded for 7 days
  • 3 year driving ban
  • 14 days jail time
  • Mandatory medical exam

Third offense:

  • 10 year driving ban
  • 90 days imprisonment
  • Mandatory medical exam

More information can be found on the Government of Newfoundland & Labrador‘s website, as well as DUI.ca.

Growing Your Own

Most provinces will allow Canadians to grow their own cannabis at home, with Manitoba and Quebec being the exception. View the varying rules and regulations by province below.

British Columbia

Alberta

Saskatchewan

Manitoba

Ontario

Quebec

Prince Edward Island

New Brunswick

Nova Scotia

Newfoundland

Rules and Bylaws

Most provinces will allow Canadians to grow their own cannabis at home, with Manitoba and Quebec being the exception. View the varying rules and regulations by province below.

British Columbia

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Both government and privately-run storefronts and online sales
Grow your own?: Up to four plants, out of public sight
Where to smoke?: Prohibited in cars, in areas frequented by children, and wherever tobacco is restricted
Other notes: Landlords can restrict cultivation and smoking on their properties
B.C. marijuana legalization laws

Alberta

Age of legal consumption: 18+
Where to buy: Privately-run retail stores and government-operated online sales
Grow your own?: Up to four plants, subject to restrictions from landlords
Where to smoke?: Prohibited in cars, in areas frequented by children, and wherever tobacco is restricted.
Other notes: Kids are banned from entering cannabis stores, even with adult accompaniment 
Alberta marijuana legalization laws

Saskatchewan

Age of legal consumption:19+
Where to buy: Privately-run storefronts and online sales
Grow your own?: Up to four plants, subject to landlord restrictions
Where to smoke?: Only on private property and in private residences, restricted use around minors
Other notes: Number of retail licenses issued will be restricted for first three years of legalization

Saskatchewan marijuana legalization laws

Manitoba

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Privately-run storefronts and online sales
Grow your own?: Not permitted
Where to smoke?: Only in private residences
Other notes: Legal age is one year above drinking age. It’s prohibited to sell cannabis to someone who is impaired by alcohol or other substances. Municipalities can hold a referendum to ban cannabis stores in their community.
Manitoba marijuana legalization laws

Ontario

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Online sales initially and then private retail shops by April 2019
Grow your own?: Up to four plants
Where to smoke?: Only on private property, subject to landlord restrictions
Other notes: Municipalities will have a “one time window” during which they will be able to opt-out of having cannabis stores within their boundaries
Ontario marijuana legalization laws

Quebec

Age of legal consumption: 18+
Where to buy: Government-operated storefronts and online sales
Grow your own?: Not permitted
Where to smoke?: Only where tobacco may be smoked, with the exception of university and CEGEP campuses
Other notes: Six companies signed on to provide the Quebec government with at least 62,000 kg of cannabis during first year of operation
Quebec marijuana legalization laws

Prince Edward Island

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Government-operated retail locations and online sales
Grow your own?: Up to four plants, so long as they’re not accessible to minors
Where to smoke?: Only on private residences, with some exceptions for certain public spaces
Other notes: PEI will have four government-owned retail locations for cannabis in 2018 in Charlottetown, Summerside, Montague, and West Prince
P.E.I. marijuana legalization laws

New Brunswick

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Government-operated storefronts and online sales
Grow your own?: Up to four plants
Where to smoke?: Only on private property and in private residences
Other notes: 20 cannabis stores will open in July 2018. All cannabis grown outdoors must be located behind a locked enclosure that is 1.52 metres high. Landlords can restrict cultivation and smoking on their properties.
New Brunswick marijuana legalization laws

Nova Scotia

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Government-operated storefronts and online sales
Grow your own?: Up to four plants
Where to smoke?: Only where tobacco may be smoked, subject to landlord restrictions
Other notes: 9 cannabis stores currently confirmed in: Amherst, Dartmouth, Halifax, Lower Sackville, New Glasgow, Sydney River, Truro and Yarmouth
Nova Scotia marijuana legalization laws

Newfoundland

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Privately-run licensed storefronts and government-operated online sales
Grow your own?: Up to four plants
Where to smoke?: Only on private property and in private residences
Other notes: Some shops will be run by Tweed, a subsidiary of cannabis giant Canopy Growth. 
N.L. marijuana legalization laws

Northwest Territories

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Privately-run liquor stores and government-operated online sales
Grow your own?: Up to four plants
Where to smoke?: On private property and in private residences. Smoking will also be allowed on trails, highways, streets, roads and in parks when they are not in use for public events.
Other notes: Cannabis will initially be sold in existing liquor stores, with possibility of cannabis-only stores in the future. Individual communities will be able to enact cannabis restrictions and/or prohibitions. Landlords will also be able to declare their properties smoke-free.
N.W.T. marijuana legalization laws

Nunavut

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Established online vendors will be invited to sell in Nunavut, and private businesses can apply for a licence to sell cannabis, but consultation requirements mean no stores will open in 2018.
Grow your own?: Not banned, but the provincial government will regulate whether or not plants can be grown at home in the future
Where to smoke?: Not permitted in public places, other than a designated cannabis lounge or permitted event
Other notes: The offical Inuktitut name for cannabis is “surrarnaqtuq”
Nunavut marijuana legalization law

Yukon

Age of legal consumption: 19+
Where to buy: Government-operated storefronts and online sales.
Grow your own?: Up to four plants, out of public sight
Where to smoke?: Only on private property and in private residences, subject to landlord restrictions
Other notes: Whitehorse recently amended zoning bylaws to allow government-operated cannabis sales in only one area: Marwell. Licensing of private retailers will follow in the future
Yukon marijuana legalization laws